Formula 1

Formula 1
The first Formula 1 world champion was Giuseppe Farina, driving an Alfa Romeo, in 1950.

And since the start of the annual world drivers championship…  32 different drivers from 14 different countries have won the most prestigious title in world motor sport.

 web_formula1L180Michael Schumacher (7) holds the record for the most F1 world championships, followed by the legendary Argentine Juan Fangio (5) and Alain Prost (4).

A host of drivers… from Alberto Ascari to Fernando Alonso, Graham Hill to Mika Hakkinen, Jackie Stewart to the great Ayrton Senna have also won multiple world titles.

At 23 years, 133 days Sebastien Vettel (2010) is the youngest ever world champion, whilst at 46 years, 41 days Fangio (1957) is the oldest.

Ferrari (15), the only ever-present team through the history of the Formula 1, have won the most F1 Constructors’ Titles with McLaren (12) and Williams (7) next in the roll of honour.

In the 60 plus years of racing, Formula 1 Grand Prix racing has been staged all over the world.

All through the Americas (Canada, USA, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina), right across the European continent, through to the Middle East (Bahrain, UAE) and Africa (Morocco, South Africa).

More recently, under the influence of F1 supremo Bernie Ecclestone, racing has spread through Asia and the Far East (India, Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea, China) and the circuit also makes it Down Under, with the Australian Grand Prix – traditionally the first race on the FI calendar.

There are currently  20 races to each Formula 1 season, with the FIA (Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile) sanctioned championship running from March to November each year.

It’s 25 points for a win, with rewards all the way down to 10th spot (1 point) meaning almost half the field at each race (usually 24 cars line up) are capable of scoring vital world championship points.
Recent trends in Formula 1

Modern day F1 racing  has been dominated by Red Bull Racing, McLaren and Ferrari with Mercedes, Lotus-Renault and Williams-Renault providing the nearest challenge.

In terms of the drivers, the last 10 years have seen 6 different drivers win the world title.

Michael Schumacher (3), Fernando Alonso (2) and Sebastien Vettel (2) all winning more than once… with Kimi Raikkonen of Finland and two British drivers, Lewis Hamilton and Jenson Button also taking the chequered flag in the points table.

And despite numerous changes to the regulations of the sport and the scoring system, the title race still centres around three or four main teams and their respective drivers.
What markets are available in Formula 1 betting?

The F1 betting markets, like most sports, have changed dramatically in the past few years.

Formula 1 tipsters will still look to the obvious markets…

Outright race winner, pole position, winning constructor, fastest lap of the race, individual driver finishing positions and finishing position match bets (driver A to beat driver B).

However, more creative markets will tempt the more informed motor racing expert

These will cover such things as fastest times in Q3 qualifying as well as Q2 qualifying, first car to retire in the race, number of cars to finish the race, use of the safety car… and many more!

In fact if you’re interested in professional Formula 1 betting you can get involved with over 50 different markets for every single Grand Prix race.  That’s some choice!
Why bet on F1 motor racing?web_formula1R180

Regardless of the spectacle itself – for example, few sporting events match the appeal of races like the Monaco GP –  Formula 1 offers the classic mixture of reliable form and completely unexpected results.

On the one hand… there are established teams, well-known drivers and a readily available amount of performance data on which to base your F1 bets.

On the other… unavoidable crashes, unforeseen retirements and all manner of rule changes, penalties and infringements which make any Formula 1 betting tips far from certainties.

This means motor racing offers something for the studious backer as well as the casual observer.

There’s a good chance the favourite will win the race… but there’s also a reasonable possibility that he won’t.

And even if the choice of drivers who might win a Grand Prix is limited, and the outright betting seems to be centred around only a handful of teams… there are still plenty of markets available which mean you can have just as much fun (and make just as much F1 betting profits) from watching the action at the back of the field as opposed to the front.

That’s why Formula 1 motor racing isn’t just a good sport to watch, it’s also a great sport to bet on!

Want to get involved with Formula 1 betting, no problem.

 

Get in touch with me anytime by phone or email.

My numbers are 01625 315654 (office) or 07752 768094 (personal mobile) or you can drop me an email to matthew@matthewwalton.co.uk

Matt

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matthew@matthewwalton.co.uk
01625 315654 (Office)
07752 768094 (Personal Mobile)